Japanese Curry Using Roux Cubes (including lots of secret tips) - Sudachi Recipes (2022)

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I've been making curry with roux for longer than I can even remember and this post is pretty much my life's research. I wanna share some tips on how to make the ULTIMATE Japanese style curry using roux. Bring your homemade curry to restaurant level with these tips!

Japanese Curry Using Roux Cubes (including lots of secret tips) - Sudachi Recipes (1)

Disclaimer: This post contains Amazon and Dokodemo affiliate links to help our readers find the products used by us. Sudachi Recipes earn a small percentage from qualifying purchases at no extra cost to you. See disclaimer for more info.

Jump to:
  • Japanese Curry Rice
  • Japanese Curry Ingredients
  • Choosing the Roux
  • Next day curry is better? (Myth?)
  • Secret tips for making Japanese curry (Surprise Ingredients)
  • A few more idea's...
  • Should I use water to make Japanese Curry?
  • Check out our video for How to Make Japanese Curry with Roux cubes
  • Japanese Curry Using Roux Cubes (Including Lots of Secret Tips)
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Japanese Curry Rice

It’s safe to say that Japanese curry rice or "kare raisu" (カレーライス) is one of the most popular dishes in Japan. It is eaten and enjoyed at home, in restaurants, diners and takeaways. I've gotta say, Japanese curry rice is a true comfort dish for me!

It's pretty easy to make too, especially if you have the premade roux in a box. In fact, Japanese curry roux is so tasty, you can't really fail... but why stop at tasty? Why not make it the best it can be? I'll be sharing secret tips and ingredients to help you make the best curry you've ever made!

A Brief History of Japanese Curry

First, let's learn a little bit about how Japanese curry came to be. Curry rice surely has an interesting history. As most people probably already know, curry originated from India, the land of spice. It then traveled to U.K. and then made its way from the U.K. to Japan!

Yep that's right, Japanese curry is based on the U.K's version of curry. Japanese curry rice is not so spicy compared to its Indian counterparts, it’s also quite sweet and thick like a stew.

I love how curry has travelled around the world picking up new styles and flavours on its way.

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Japanese Curry Ingredients

A basic Japanese curry rice usually uses 4 main ingredients:

  • Meat (Beef, Pork, Chicken or Seafood)
  • Potato
  • Onion
  • Carrot

That's not to say that you can't swap these for other ingredients. Things like cauliflower, brocolli, green beans, shimeji mushrooms, okra, aubergine, sweet potato and bell peppers are also great additions or substitutes.

Meat

When it comes to protein of choice, I'd say that beef and chicken are most common, however pork and seafood curries are also well loved in Japan.

Although you are not limited to these options, for best results I recommend:

  • Beef - Shoulder
  • Chicken - Thigh

They're a bit fatty so they add more flavour to the curry. Just make sure to brown them first as this helps improve flavour, texture and crisp up the fat/skin. (If you don't crisp up the fat and skin before adding the liquid then it will become rubbery when boiling.)

Curry is also a great way to use leftover meat too. If you're using meat that is already cooked you can add it to the broth at the same time as the curry roux.

Choosing the Roux

The chocolate bar shaped Japanese curry roux comes in lots of varieties, so here are some things that are useful to know.

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Levels of Spice

There are 3 main levels of curry roux in Japan ranging from sweet and mild to hot and spicy. Here are the symbols that you need to look out for.

  • 甘口 (amakuchi) - Sweet, mild and even kids can eat it with ease. Not really spicy at all. Usually labeled as level 1-2.
  • 中辛 (chuukara) - A little spicy but still pretty easy to handle. Usually labelled Level 3 in spiciness.
  • 辛口 (karakuchi) - Hot and spicy curry roux will usually be labelled as level 4,5 or 6, with 6 being the spiciest. Great for spice lovers.

If you're not sure, I'd say sticking with the middle option is always a safe bet.

Curry Roux Brands

There are so many different brands to choose from that it can be overwhelming, especially if you're in a Japanese supermarket or shopping online.

Read more about the characteristics of these brands below.

Golden Curry

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As far as I know, Golden Curry by S&B is the brand that is the most accessible outside Japan. I even saw it in Sainsbury's (U.K. supermarket chain) when I lived in England.

You can buy mild, medium and hot S&B Golden Curry on Amazon. I recommend getting one of each and you can purchase as a bundle for a lower price here.

Characteristics:

  • Aroma of different spices (many people in Japan say Golden Curry has the nicest aroma)
  • Spicier than normal Japanese curry
  • Rich flavour

There also a special editions of golden curry that you can purchase on dokodemo, such as Premium Golden and Extra Hot Golden.

Vermont Curry

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I've always known Vermont Curry by House as the curry with the apple and honey on the package. As you can expect, Vermont Curry is sweeter than the others and smells a bit sweet too.

You can buy mild or medium Vermont curry in packs of two on Amazon. (Each pack contains 12 servings.)

Characteristics:

  • Sweet flavour and smell
  • Fruity
  • Lighter in colour
  • Kid friendly

House also have a premium curry only available in Japan. It goes simply by the name of "The Curry" and can be bought on Dokodemo in mild or medium.

(Video) Japanese Beef Curry Using Roux Cubes (Incl. secret tips)

Java Curry

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Even though it might not be as accessible as the two above, Java Curry has always been my favourite. It's known as the spicy brand and their products have many different spice levels. The one in the picture above is the spiciest curry by Java.

You can buy medium hot and hot Java curry in single packs on Amazon. (One pack makes 9 servings.)

Characteristics:

  • Spicy and hot
  • Rich and sharp
  • Slightly sour

Other brands available in Japan

There are many other curry roux brands available in Japan such as:

  • Kokumaro Curry (こくまろカレー): Rich and creamy (medium and hot available on Amazon)
  • Dinner Curry (ディナーカレー): Elegant (mild/sweet, medium and hot available on Dokodemo)
  • Premium Juku Curry (プレミアム熟カレー): Complex flavour (mild, medium and hot available on Dokodemo)
  • Zeppin Rich and spicy (medium available on Dokodemo)
  • S&B Curry Prince (カレーの王子さま) Especially for kids, sweet and mild taste (available on Dokodemo)

Why I always mix different brands?

Even though each product has so many different spices, I always mix at least 2-3 different brands. Why? I don't have logical explanation to it, but I truly believe that one secret of good Japanese curry is jumbling all the different flavours to a certain degree.

I usually try to mix at 2-3 different spice levels (Sweet, Medium, Spicy) because that way, you can get sweet apple and honey flavour from a mild one like Vermont and also complex spiciness and heat from brands like Java.

Mixing brands is actually a common thing you can see in ordinary Japanese home cooking as well. If you use one brand and stick to the instructions, your curry won't be unique.

Complexity is a key.

For this recipe I mixed 2 cubes of golden curry (medium), 2 cubes of Java (hot) and 2 cubes of Vermont (sweet).

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If you want to experiment with different brands, I highly recommend these bundles on Amazon.

MILD bundle (Contains Golden curry and Vermont)

MEDIUM bundle (Contains Golden curry, Vermont, Java and Kokumaro)

HOT bundle (Contains Golden curry, Vermont, Java and Kokumaro).

Next day curry is better? (Myth?)

What every Japanese family knows about curry is, “Second day curry is the best curry” meaning Japanese curry tastes better next day than on the day it's cooked.

As a Japanese person myself, I personally think that is true.

Well, well I did a bit of research and found a scientific reason for that.

Why is it better?

Over night, the ingredients (vegetables and meat) in curry start to give out “Umami (Glutamic acid)” as well as fructose, starch, fibre…etc

So it generally builds up depth of flavour and thickness over night, it also becomes richer. That’s why it’s better to eat it the next day if you can wait! Or eat it twice in two days and compare the difference…

Secret tips for making Japanese curry (Surprise Ingredients)

Using only curry roux cubes makes great curry for sure, but using secret ingredients with roux cubes make pro curry and rice.

In fact, did you know most restaurants serving curry rice do not actually make curry from scratch. They actually use roux cubes too! So what makes them special compared to home cooked curry? The answer is in the secret ingredients.

I'll give you some ideas of secret ingredients that improve the taste of home cooked curry rice. Using different secret ingredients every time and then see how's different from last time!

Caramelized onions

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This is a pretty recent discovery for me. I always add onions to curry (despite not being a huge fan of onions myself haha) and I always thought that frying them until softened is enough. That is until I tried adding "caramelized onions" and it was a game changer!

Whether you have Japanese curry roux or not, caramelized onions will add a rich, gravy like taste to your curry as well as improve the colour. It's time consuming, but it's worth putting in that time to level up your curry. I've included steps on how to caramelize onions in the recipe below.

  • Timing: 40 mins
  • Amount: 1.5 - 2 onions
  • Recommended: Someone who wants depth of flavour
  • Effect: Richer more gravy like taste, deepens the brown colour

Chocolate

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This one is kind of understandable, isn't it?

A small amount of chocolate will make the curry richer. It's a secret ingredient so don't put too much though!

  • Timing: After the roux has melted
  • Amount: 2-3g
  • Recommended: Someone who's not good with spice
  • Effect: Softening the spiciness

Instant coffee Powder

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Whenever I make curry and rice with roux cubes, I make sure to add instant coffee.

It definitely contributes to a richer taste!

  • Timing: After the roux has melted
  • Amount: 2 tsp
  • Recommended: Someone who wants deeper and richer taste
  • Effect: Richen the curry

Red wine

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(Video) Japanese Beef Curry from Scratch (How to make homemade curry roux!)

This is another secret ingredient that I use regularly.

It will add a nice punch too the roux and give it a little bit of European stew taste.

  • Timing: Same time as water
  • Amount: Substitute 10% of water amount (so this recipe would be 720ml water 80ml wine)
  • Recommended: Someone who wants to add some sourness
  • Effect: Making it more refreshing, adds a touch of sourness

Soy sauce

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I personally add a bit of soy sauce every time. I usually use Japanese brand Kikkoman.

As you can guess, it will add a bit more umami and Japanese taste to the curry!

  • Timing: Right before the roux cubes
  • Amount: 1 tbsp
  • Recommended: Someone who wants to add Japanese/Wafu taste
  • Effect: Making it more Japanesey / adding umami

Tomato juice/puree/ketchup

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This is a popular addition but I personally don't use it as I don't like curry being too sour.

But if you want to add tomato's sourness, you can add any of these tomato products. But be careful with tomato puree, a little goes a long way and adding too much can make it too tomato-y. (Speaking from my experience)

  • Timing: When you add the vegetables
  • Amount: 1 tbsp-3 tbsp
  • Recommended: Someone who wants to add sourness
  • Effect: Making it sour and tomatoey

A few more idea's...

There are seriously endless possibilities when it comes to curry and I'm always on a mission to create the best curry there can be, but in the end it all comes down to personal preference.

Here are a few more ingredients you can try depending on whether you want to make your curry sweeter, richer, spicier or more sour.

Sweetness

  • Sugar
  • Grated apple
  • Honey
  • Jam
  • Apple sauce

Spiciness

  • Chili powder
  • Garam Masala
  • Chili sauce
  • Fresh chili
  • Mustard

Richness

  • Butter
  • Coffee
  • Dark chocolate
  • Caramelized onion
  • Wine

Sourness

  • Worcestershire Sauce
  • Ginger
  • Tomato Puree
  • Tinned Tomato
  • Wine

If you know any other ingredients that have improved your curry, comment below and I'll add them to the list!

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Should I use water to make Japanese Curry?

So all of the curry roux cubes will tell you to mix with x amount of water, but you're certainly not limited to using plain water. The liquid added to curry is yet another opportunity to add more flavour.

Here are a few idea's to try instead of water.

  • Beef stock
  • Chicken stock
  • Dashi
  • Vegetable stock
  • Black tea

Be careful when using beef or chicken stock, as it can make the curry too salty. Maybe you can try adding 50/50 stock and water and work from there.

As I mentioned before, you can also replace 10% of the water with red wine but if you don't want to use alcohol I've heard of some people using apple juice, grape juice or something like that! It's so fun to be creative with curry!

I hope this post inspires you to try out new ingredients and helps you to make the best curry you've ever made! And if you don't have access to Japanese roux cubes, check out my post on how to make Japanese curry from scratch here!

I think overall, my favourite secret ingredient is coffee, I add it every time!
What's your favourite surprise ingredient? Comment below and let us know!

Check out our video for How to Make Japanese Curry with Roux cubes

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Japanese Curry Using Roux Cubes (including lots of secret tips) - Sudachi Recipes (15)

Japanese Curry Using Roux Cubes (Including Lots of Secret Tips)

★★★★★5 from 4 reviews
  • Author: Yuto Omura
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Yield: 6 Portions 1x
Print Recipe

Description

How to Make Japanese Curry Using Roux Cubes (Including secret ingredients to add depth of flavour and complexity)

Ingredients

Scale

(Video) 5 Ways to Improve your Japanese Curry #shorts

Caramelized Onions

  • 1.5 - 2 Onions
  • 1 tbsp Olive oil
  • 1 pinch Salt

Curry

  • 250g (½lb) Meat of your choice (Beef, Chicken, Pork)
  • 1 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 2 cloves Garlic
  • 1 Carrot
  • 2 - 3 Medium Potatoes
  • ½ a Box of Japanese Curry Roux (approx 100g)
  • 700 - 900ml Water (This is an average, check the box for exact measurements)
  • 6 bowls Cooked White Rice
  • Any of the secret ingredients you like

Instructions

Caramelizing the onions

(If you don't want caramelized onion then skip these steps and cook the onion straight in the pot for 5-10 mins before adding the meat.)

  1. Cut the onion into slices.

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  2. Heat a pan on medium with 1 tbsp olive oil.

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  3. Add the onions and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally so that they don't burn.

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  4. After 10 minutes, sprinkle with salt and mix.
  5. Lower the heat and cook for another 30 minutes, stir every few minutes prevent burning. (If the onions stick to the pan, add a bit of water to help unstick them.)

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  6. While they're cooking, prepare the rest of the ingredients.

Curry

  1. First, cut your meat into bite size pieces.

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  2. Peel the potato and carrot, cut them into large pieces. Try not to cut them too small otherwise they will fall apart during the cooking process.

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  3. Heat a large pot on medium and add 1 tbsp butter and 2 cloves of crushed garlic.
  4. Once the butter is melted and the garlic is fragrant, add the meat to the pan and sprinkle with a pinch of salt. Brown the outsides to seal in the juices.

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  5. Add all of the carrot and potato to the pot. Cook together for a few minutes.

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  6. Add the caramelized onion to the pot and stir.

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  7. Next, pour in 700 - 900ml of water (depending on your roux) and bring it to the boil. (If you want to add red wine, swap 10% of the water for the wine. Example: 850ml water becomes 765ml and 85ml of wine. You can also add tomato puree etc here if desired.)

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    (Video) How to make Japanese Chicken Katsu Curry (from scratch)

  8. Once it's boiling, turn the heat down to medium-low and simmer for 20 mins with the lid slightly ajar.

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  9. While you're waiting, check back from time to time and use a spoon to skim the foamy residue from the top of the simmering liquid. (If you want to add soy sauce, add it now)

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  10. After 20 mins, turn the heat down to low and add your Japanese curry roux.

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  11. Mix in the roux and then simmer without the lid for 5-10 minutes. (Stir from time to time to make sure it doesn't get stuck to the bottom of the pan)

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  12. If it gets too thick, add more water (50ml-100ml at a time). If it's too thin, cook for longer.
  13. Optional: If you want to add chocolate or coffee powder you can add them now.

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  14. Once you reach your desired consistency, serve with white rice and enjoy!

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Notes

Please refer to the roux packaging for exact roux and water measurements.

If you have leftover curry, let it cool down for 30 mins, put it in a microwavable container with a lid and store in the fridge for 2-3 days or up to one month in the freezer. (The potatoes don't freeze well so remove them before freezing.) Note that curry will stain plastic containers so it's recommended to use a glass container if you have one.

Leftovers can be reheated on the stove or in the microwave. It might be thicker the next day so add more water if necessary.

  • Prep Time: 10 mins
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 20 mins
  • Category: Mains
  • Method: Boil
  • Cuisine: Japanese

Keywords: How to make Japanese curry, Japanese curry roux recipe,how can I improve my curry, curry ingredients, what can i add to Japanese curry,How to make Japanese curry rice,Japanese curry rice recipe,What is the difference between Japanese curry and Indian curry,Ingredients for Japanese curry rice,Japanese curry recipe,Instructions for Japanese curry roux,secret Japanese curry ingredients,Japanese katsu curry,How to make the best Japanese Curry, how long can you keep Japanese curry, how long can you freeze japanese curry for,

Frequently Asked Questions

What does Japanese curry taste like?

Compared to Indian curry, I would say Japanese curry is less spicy but thicker and sweeter.
And you can usually taste a little bit of a dashi-like flavour.

How do you make Japanese curry thicker?

You can add 1 tbsp of water and flour mix slurry but I personally don't recommend to do that.
Even if it's thin, as you simmer, it will be thicker and definitely thicker and richer next day, I think patience is mostly needed here.

Is Japanese curry spicy?

It depends on what kind of roux cubes you use. In Japan there are usually 3 types and 6 levels.
• Sweet (level 1-2)
• Medium (level 3)
• Hot (level 4,5,6)
The sweet one is kids friendly so it's actually quite sweet and not spicy at all, on the other hand, hot one is actually quite hot (by Japanese standards anyway).

What is Japanese curry called?

It's either カレーライス (Curry rice) or カレー (Curry)

Which Japanese curry is the best?

It definitely depends on your preference, but I personally like:
Java curry (ジャワカレー, Hot)
Golden curry (ゴールデンカレー, Spicy)
Vermont curry (バーモントカレー, Sweet)
And I usually get these three above and mix together rather than only using one brand.

FAQs

What makes Japanese curry thick? ›

The thickness (viscosity) of curry comes about by the action of starch when the flour contained in the roux is heated. Curry will not thicken if there is not enough heat after adding a roux to the pot.

What is Japanese curry roux made of? ›

Curry roux is made from butter, flour, and a combination of spices, which can include cumin, cardamom, cayenne pepper, turmeric, or Japanese curry powder, a blend that's slightly milder than standard Indian curry powder, with more umami. These spices help the roux achieve a bright, glossy hue and deeply savory flavor.

What gives Japanese curry its flavor? ›

Japanese curry is relatively mild compared to its Asian counterparts because it is made of an harmonious blend of curry powder and spices in which no particular ingredient stands out. Slightly sweet ingredients such as sautéed onions, grated apples, carrots or honey are also usually added to add sweetness and umami.

How long do Japanese curry cubes last? ›

We recommend that it not be stored in the refrigerator for longer than about three months.

How do you thicken a curry roux? ›

Start with a roux.

Use wheat flour, rice flour, or coconut flour plus a fat (like ghee, olive oil, or coconut oil) in equal amounts. Cook both ingredients for a few minutes to cook out the raw flour taste, then add your curry ingredients. Once the whole curry dish comes to a boil, the sauce will thicken. 7.

What vegetables go in Japanese curry? ›

The triad of vegetables most commonly found in Japanese curry are onion, potato, and carrots, but you can use almost any combination of vegetables and protein. Here, I've added celery, green beans, and corn to the mix, and use chicken thighs as my protein.

What is the red stuff in Japanese curry? ›

Japanese curry is often served alongside with steamed rice and an accompaniment of bright crimson red relish called Fukujinzuke (福神漬け). These pickled vegetables are sweet and tangy, which is perfect to set off the richness of curry.

What spices make Japanese curry spicy? ›

Japanese curry is meant to be mild. Even the commercially bought ones that are labeled hot are not very spicy. Two spices that can bump up the heat without changing the flavour are cayenne and black pepper. A little cayenne pepper goes a long way so be sure to add just a pinch at a time.

Why is Japanese curry so good? ›

The stand-out feature of a Japanese curry is its thick, rich sauce. The thickness of the sauce which can only be found in Japanese curry is supported and beloved by many. The rich and indulgent sauce mixes with rice so perfectly, you will find it difficult stoping eating.

What does Japanese curry roux taste like? ›

Japanese Curry has a delicious mix of sweet, savory, and umami flavors. It has bold flavors paired usually with rice. The curry is said to have a more prominently sweet and mild taste than spicy. It is also characterized by delicate umami flavors.

What makes Japanese curry different? ›

The most notable differences between Japanese curry and Indian curry are the color and texture. While Indian curries can vary widely in texture from thin and soup-like to very thick, Japanese curry is usually thicker and more like a gravy, due to its incorporation of flour or roux into the mixture (via Tastylicious).

What do Japanese people eat with curry? ›

What To Serve With Japanese Curry: 12 Best Sides
  • Rice. Rice is the most obvious choice when it comes to what to serve with Japanese curry, and you could argue that it's an essential rather than a choice! ...
  • A fried egg. ...
  • Udon noodles. ...
  • Spinach ohitashi. ...
  • Salad. ...
  • Eggplant dengaku. ...
  • 7. Japanese pickles. ...
  • Tempura battered vegetables.
7 Jul 2021

Can Japanese curry be kept overnight? ›

Japanese curry is ideal for freezing. I often cook up a big batch of leftovers and keep them in the refrigerator for a few days or in the freezer for up to a month.

Can I use expired curry cubes? ›

I checked it out, and here's what I found: Most curry pastes last well beyond their expiration dates, especially when they are unopened. Even opened and refrigerated curry paste will last well beyond its expiration date. However, the flavor will not be as strong as a fresh jar.

Can you leave Japanese curry out overnight? ›

The USDA says food that has been left out of the fridge for more than two hours should be thrown away. At room temperature, bacteria grows incredibly fast and can make you sick. Reheating something that has been sitting at room temperature for longer than two hours won't be safe from bacteria.

How much water do you put in Japanese curry? ›

1 tablespoon Vegetable Oil. 850 ml (3 1/2 cups) Water (750 ml (3 cups) if cooking in a covered pot)

How long should you simmer curry? ›

Simmering time will depend on the type of curry and cut of meat. Chicken, fish, and lentil curries should simmer for 20-30 minutes. Lamb, beef, and mutton curry will simmer between 1-2 hours until the meat is fork-tender.

Does simmering thicken curry? ›

Luckily, there are many quick and simple fixes for a thin curry. You can use foods like yogurt to get the curry to thicken. You can also add flour or corn starch. Simmering the curry for a few extra minutes can also get it reach the right consistency.

Can I put eggplant in Japanese curry? ›

{Vegan Adaptable} This Vegetarian Japanese Curry is loaded with thick, meaty slices of king oyster mushrooms and colorful vegetables like kabocha, eggplant, and asparagus. With homemade Japanese curry roux, this dish is no doubt our family's favorite for a bright and flavorful dinner!

What is katsu curry made from? ›

Katsu Curry is simply a rice and curry with a cutlet on it. Since the cutlet is a meat dish on its own, my curry does not have any meat in it. I added three vegetables in the curry that are commonly used to make a Japanese Curry.

How much water do you add to Golden curry? ›

S&B Golden Curry (Mild) (日本咖哩 (微辣))

Stir-fry your favourite meat and vegetables. Add 1200 ml water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for approximately 15 minutes, till meat is tender.

What are the pickles in Japanese curry? ›

Rakkyo are sweet pickled scallions that are served alongside Japanese curry. Rakkyo lend a sweet, crunchy bite that, like fukujinzuke, helps to augment the spicy and salty flavors of curry.

What is Fukujin? ›

It's sliced vegetables pickled in soy sauce a teahouse with a field and Ikenohata devised seasoning liquid in cakes served with tea and a snack, and that this prototype was completed soon. It's learned about as a specialty in Edo as well as radish pickles. Tokushima.

Is Japanese curry healthy? ›

Japanese curry is usually not very healthy, as the sauce is made primarily of fats and carbs with the protein source often deep fried. A single serving of Japanese curry can be upwards of 500 calories, consisting mainly of fats and carbs. This makes it a less than ideal food choice for those trying to stay fit.

What is S&B curry powder made of? ›

Curry powder is a mixture of spices in different ways to enhance the taste in oriental cooking. The ingredients in this curry are Turmeric, coriander, fenugreek, cumin, red pepper, black pepper, cinamon, ginger, star anise, cloves, cardamon, fennel, nutmeg, laurel leaves, allspice, garlic.

What cut for Japanese curry? ›

Chuck Roast Or Round Steak

The most commonly used cuts for the meat in Japanese Curry are chuck roast and round steak.

How do you give curry depth? ›

Always add less water than what is needed to your curry. Let the water mix in and simmer for 10-15 seconds. This gives you an idea of the thickness of your curry before you go ahead and add in more.

What was the national dish of Japan? ›

Curryrice. The “national dish” - curry-rice - is said to be eaten by many Japanese people once a week. It's more than 150 years since the Japanese came across this exotic dish that originated from India.

Why does Japanese curry taste different than Indian curry? ›

For one, Japanese curry uses curry powder with less spices whereas Indian curry uses a variety of bases such as cumin, paprika, turmeric, and many more. Indian curry is more vibrant and bursting with flavor, while Japanese curry is sumptuous and “umami” but in a more understated manner.

Is Japanese curry better than Indian curry? ›

Japanese curry has a thick gravy-like texture that is usually milder and sweeter than Indian curry. The base vegetables used are often onion, carrots, and potato with chicken, pork, or beef being the popular meats.
...
Summary comparison table.
FactorJapanese CurryIndian Curry
Spice levelsMild to mediumMild to very hot
8 more rows
24 May 2020

How do you make Japanese curry sauce thicker? ›

The best way to thicken a Japanese curry is with a store-bought roux. Heat your curry sauce until it starts to simmer. Add a small amount of the store-bought roux to the curry sauce and stir until dissolved. Wait 2-3 minutes to see the thickening effect.

How do you thicken Japanese sauce? ›

In Japan, we use potato starch (we call it katakuriko 片栗粉) to make a slurry. It is known to make a thicker texture than cornstarch can make. However, since cornstarch is easier to get here in the United States and generally used in Chinese cooking, you can use cornstarch in place of potato starch in my recipes.

How do you make Japanese curry less watery? ›

Mix cornstarch or potato starch (katakuriko) in cold water. Once reasonably dissolved, add it to the curry pot. This type of thickener can create a slightly odd texture in a Japanese curry, as the browned roux creates a more velvety texture, but that doesn't mean I haven't done it before in a pinch.

What consistency should Japanese curry be? ›

Japanese curry is a thick curry with a stew-like consistency and commonly includes a protein, sweet onions, carrots, and potatoes. The sauce is thickened by a roux (a mixture of fat and flour, and an addition of curry spices).

Does coconut milk thicken curry? ›

Coconut Milk/ Cream

Coconut is a great ingredient used for thickening curries. It can be used in any form - milk, cream or grated. This method is most suited for Thai, South Indian and other Asian curries. It not only makes your curry flavorful, but also makes the curry creamier.

How thick should a curry sauce be? ›

Curry sauce can of course be thick or thin, depending on your preference. But generally, the ideal consistency would be one that's not too runny and not too thick, either.

How can I thicken a curry without flour or cornflour? ›

A thick yogurt, like Greek yogurt, works best. Simply add a small amount of yogurt, like a spoonful, at a time. Stir your yogurt into the curry and keep adding a little more at a time until it reaches your desired thickness. This is great for Indian-style curries as a cream substitute.

How much water do you put in Japanese curry? ›

1 tablespoon Vegetable Oil. 850 ml (3 1/2 cups) Water (750 ml (3 cups) if cooking in a covered pot)

How can I thicken sauce without flour or cornstarch? ›

7 Ways To Thicken Sauce Without Flour
  1. Cornstarch. Cornstarch is likely the most common way to thicken sauces without flour. ...
  2. Arrowroot or Tapioca Flour. Both of these options can be used in the same way you'd use cornstarch in a recipe. ...
  3. Gelatin. ...
  4. Vegetable Puree. ...
  5. Cashew Cream. ...
  6. Oat Flour. ...
  7. Egg Yolk.
8 Feb 2022

How do you make a roux for teriyaki sauce? ›

  1. Step 1: Cook The Flour. For the right thickness of teriyaki sauce, use 4 tablespoons of flour and an equal amount of oil for each cup of liquid. ...
  2. Step 2: Make A Roux. Stir the flour on medium heat for 1-2 minutes to make a roux; it should look like wet sand at this stage.
  3. Step 3: Pour In Your Teriyaki Sauce.
30 Jul 2022

Can I add butter to Japanese curry? ›

Try not to cut them too small otherwise they will fall apart during the cooking process. Heat a large pot on medium and add 1 tbsp butter and 2 cloves of crushed garlic. Once the butter is melted and the garlic is fragrant, add the meat to the pan and sprinkle with a pinch of salt.

How do I thicken my slow cooker curry? ›

Cornstarch, potato starch, and chickpea flour are a couple of pantry-friendly ways to thicken soups, stews, and sauces in the slow cooker. Just a tablespoon or two of any — added towards the end of cooking — will thicken sauces especially well.

Does cornstarch affect flavor? ›

Cornstarch will not affect the taste of any recipe like some other substitutes might do. You'll get the same consistency with fewer calories or carbs depending on what dish it's being used in.

What spices make Japanese curry spicy? ›

Japanese curry is meant to be mild. Even the commercially bought ones that are labeled hot are not very spicy. Two spices that can bump up the heat without changing the flavour are cayenne and black pepper. A little cayenne pepper goes a long way so be sure to add just a pinch at a time.

Is Japanese curry healthy? ›

Japanese curry is usually not very healthy, as the sauce is made primarily of fats and carbs with the protein source often deep fried. A single serving of Japanese curry can be upwards of 500 calories, consisting mainly of fats and carbs. This makes it a less than ideal food choice for those trying to stay fit.

What is Japanese curry called? ›

Japanese curry (カレー, karē) is commonly served in three main forms: curry over rice (カレーライス, karē raisu), curry udon (curry over noodles), and curry bread (a curry-filled pastry). It is one of the most popular dishes in Japan. The very common "curry rice" is most often referred to simply as "curry" (カレー, karē).

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